Maintenance Status Report - January 2014

- POSTED ON: Jan 14, 2014

There’s quite a lot of online information about weight-loss available. But almost nothing about long-term maintenance of that weight-loss. One could conclude that people who have successfully maintained a large weight-loss for 5 plus years simply lose interest in the process and move on to other interests.  However, this doesn’t appear to be the most likely conclusion.

 First, all available research indicates that less than 5% of all successful dieters actually maintain lost weight for two years after a large weight-loss.  If one chose to use the numbers of the National Weight Loss Registry (of which I am a member), this total number would be a fraction less than 1%.

 

Next, two years is not really an exceptionally long time.  When I see someone who reports success at weight-loss, I mentally say… “Yeah, come talk to me in 5 years … or 8 years.”

 

People losing weight tend to post frequently and make themselves highly visible.  People gaining weight tend not to report that fact.  Almost no one who has a very-large weight-loss, reports their maintenance numbers after the first few years of maintenance.  

 

The highly-visible, online personalities who blog about their large weight-losses, tend to disappear a year or two after their success.  I’ve followed a few of these bloggers with interest as they lost weight, thinking perhaps THIS person will be an exception… that perhaps THIS person will report a successful long-term maintenance of their large weight-loss, however, …thus far… I’ve found no exceptions.  

 

Two notable long-term bloggers which I’ve followed, “Pasta Queen” and “This Is Not A Diet – it’s my life”, were quite successful at weight-loss, and both of them … despite their efforts at maintenance, after a year or two began regaining lost weight. Both of these bloggers indicate that, during early maintenance, when they developed some specific physical problems, they re-evaluated their lives and decided that a focus on diet and weight was not something they wanted to continue working to sustain. 

 

Both of these bloggers admitted to approximately a 50 lb gain, but then chose to stop reporting on weight-issues.  From online photographs, it would appear that since that time, both bloggers have regained additional lost weight…. but as of this date…perhaps not more than half of their original amount. One, and possibly both, of these specific bloggers have embraced the “Health at Every Size” concept, which involves Intuitive Eating practices… letting one’s body tell them what, when and how much to eat. I, personally, am very curious as to whether …over time…the Set Point Theory will apply to either one of these people.  If so, the bodies of each of them would lead them to regain ALL of their lost weight back to their highest Set Point, which is probably somewhere around their highest weights. This might not be a personal problem for them as they appear to have embraced the Fat Acceptance concept, valuing their health and comfort over vanity. 

 

Unfortunately, at present, neither of these bloggers are volunteering that information. Perhaps a few years after a total weight-regain, within a “Fat Acceptance” blog, one or both of them MIGHT make such an informational choice. Quite a few other Fat Acceptance bloggers have reported similar histories.

 

I, personally, continue to have a need to avoid experiencing the fat bias that comes when one fails to meet the minimum cultural standards for female attractiveness, and I have chosen to continue my personal weight-maintenance struggle. I’ve always been healthy, at every weight. I’ve have found this to be true for many people, and never believed that Health and Obesity go hand in hand. I agree with the basic concept that people can be healthy at every size.  Unlike the courageous blogger, “Dances with Fat”, my choice is to continue giving our culture’s fat-biased-bullies my lunch money in the hopes that they won’t beat me up.

 

From the past through the present, I’ve worked very hard at trying out a great many different diets and eating plans, however, so far…. the only behaviors which have managed to stick long enough to become habitual, are consistently logging in my food every day, and managing to keep my calorie averages – over time – down. 

 

This has still resulted in me taking in more than my body can use.  For the first two years or so, after first arriving at my 115 lb goal weight, I was able to maintain without a significant upward creep by eating around 1200 calories. After about two-and-a-half years of maintenance, my weight began to creep upward, a few pounds per year … even with a 150 calorie intake reduction down to the mid 1000 calorie average range.  This past calendar year (2013), my detailed daily food records show that during the entire year, I’ve eaten a 1020 daily calorie average, … but instead of only gaining a couple of pounds… over the entire year I gained 10 more pounds. This brings me up a total of 20 pounds above my 115 lb goal weight.

 

I’ve consistently chosen to record food details and restrict calories even when experimenting with different food plans, working to keep my daily calorie average within the mid-1000 calorie range. 

 

During 2013 I spent several long time periods experimenting with eating low-carb.  Each time my weight dropped about 7 lbs initially, then plateaued.  I’ve been personally unable to adapt to long-term, low-carb eating, and after 3 months or so, I resumed eating a “balanced” diet near the same daily calorie level (around 1020). Within about a month, all of that lost weight returned (so I judge the entire loss to have been water weight). Plus, at the end of every low-carb experiment, I wound up weighing a pound or two higher… despite eating approximately the same calories Before, After, and During those experiments.

 

Due to an injury that took place long ago, I have a long-term problem with my right leg/thigh/back which is currently limiting my exercise abilities. When I move around “too much” I find I need to walk with a cane. Not unusual for someone who will turn 70 at the end of this year.  I had to give up using the free-style Gazelle (elliptical) because it aggravated my right leg/thigh/back soreness, but I am still able to walk on the Treadmill … rather slowly… for between 5 to 20 minute time periods.

 

I’m still not willing to give up my struggle to maintain my past weight-loss, even though my weight continues to climb. This morning my weight is 135.4 lbs.  I’ve recently begun – again -- working toward trying to decrease my daily calorie average an additional 100 calories via a 3 meal / zero snack eating pattern. This is a behavior pattern that I believe would be extremely effective if I were able to sustain it long-term, which is … unfortunately… something I’ve never yet been able to accomplish .. but maybe this time.

 

I’ve researched the issues very carefully, for a long period of time. Here at DietHobby (See ARCHIVES) I’ve written quite a few articles discussing the various BMR/RMR formulas which can be easily accessed with online calculators.  All of those formula calculations are merely AVERAGES, and it is common for obese or reduced obese people to fall far lower than the average. The formula STANDARD deviation is at 14%...(based on the limited number of individuals who were in the original research studies) … which is acceptable statistically, but when put into practice, this can reflect quite a large individual difference. 

 

Furthermore, research exists indicating that a ‘reduced obese’ person of “normal” weight consistently burns about 15% less while doing the same activities, than a person of the same age/height/weight who has always been “normal” weight, so it is more than reasonable to conclude that a “reduced obese” person’s basic formula numbers would be 15% below the calculated formula averages.

 

Some people might be shocked to see a comparison chart I’ve prepared based on my own age/height/weight data.


The following chart is based on the numbers for a 5 ’0” tall, 69 year old, sedentary woman.

  

RMR & BMR at Different Weights
Averages for Everyone at my Numbers (always a STANDARD deviation of 14%)
 ME: Possibly about 15% Below Average –which after including a sedentary activity factor--- is under the Mifflin “normal” RMR)
 
 
 
   calories
 
           calories
 
(RMR +1.2%)
-15%
(RMR + 1.2%)
 
 
Weight
 
“Normal”
Mifflin
RMR
 
“Normal”
Harris-Benedict
BMR
 
“Normal”
Mifflin
with Activity
MY
Mifflin
RMR
MY
 
Mifflin
 with Activity
 
 
95
 
887
 
1031
 
1064
 
860
 
 
100
 
910
 
1052
 
1092
773
883
 
 
105
 
932
 
1074
 
1119
 
904
 
 
110
 
955
 
1096
 
1146
809
926
 
*
115
 
978
 
1117
 
1173
831
949
*
*
120
 
1000
 
1139
 
1200
850
970
*
*
125
 
1023
 
1161
 
1228
870
992
*
*
130
 
1046
 
1182
 
1255
 
1015
*
*
135
 
1068
 
1204
 
1282
 
1036
*
 
140
 
1091
 
1226
 
1309
927
1058
 
 
145
 
1113
 
1248
 
1336
 
1080
 
 
150
 
1136
 
1269
 
1363
966
1102
 
 
155
 
1159
 
1291
 
1391
 
1124
 
 
160
 
1181
 
1313
 
1418
1004
1146
 
 
165
 
1204
 
1334
 
1445
 
1168
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
200
 
1363
 
1486
 
1635
1204
1322
 

 

 If these numbers are accurate this means:

For me personally, 949 calories should maintain my body at around 115 lbs,
while an average intake of only 1322 calories would maintain my body at around 200 lbs.

However, from my years of experience of watching calories, I am fairly certain that
If I simply chose to eat whatever I liked, in whatever amounts that keep me from being hungry, … (i.e. non-diet – intuitive eating) I’m fairly certain that my calories would total somewhere between 1500 and 2000 daily.  

Using the 3500 calories = 1 lb Theory --- this would bring my body back to my personal highest weight Set Point..which is between 250 and 270 lbs.


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